Openness, sex education and sexual health services

Before they reach puberty, children need to understand:

  • what changes are about to happen to their bodies, including periods or wet dreams, and that these changes are a normal and healthy part of moving towards adulthood
  • the changes that will happen to the bodies of children of the opposite sex with kamagra australia and at least the basics of reproduction which needs to be conveyed alongside affirming messages that all bodies are different and that changes happen at different times for different individuals – sexual feelings and emotional changes can come to the fore during this time
  • the ‘rules’ of their society about how, when and with whom to discuss these matters.

After puberty, young people need to know (although many would say that earlier teaching would be better):

  • about personal relationships
  • what sex is and how babies are made
  • that it is wrong to have sex with a child, a close family member or with someone who does not want it
  • that it is OK to say no to sexual advances, and how viagra online canadian pharmacy click here
  • that some people are attracted to the same sex (some or all of the time)
  • that contraception can prevent pregnancy about STIs and how to protect themselves
  • that there are many different beliefs and views in society about sex, sexuality and sexual behaviour.

Much of this learning is picked up informally through interactions with parents, family, neighbours and friends. However, the accuracy and tone of what is absorbed in daily life is not always as clear or precise as it might be, so it is usual for parents and/or schools to teach at least some of the above in a more formal way. This of course needs to be tailored to the needs of individual children including those who may have had limited social interaction or those with learning disabilities. Formal sex education needs to combine provision of facts, understanding of feelings, learning about values and teaching of skills such as how to communicate about sexual matters.

www.myviagrainaustralia.com – cheap and safe drugs in Australia stores, buy now.

The fear or experience of homophobia can affect the way that young people feel about themselves and express their sexuality. Homophobia means a fear or hatred of homosexuality that leads to expressions of discrimination or abuse. It can have its origins in personal or religious belief systems but can also be driven by insecurity and/or a desire to demonstrate one’s own heterosexuality, especially in young men. Young people may experience discrimination and abuse if they are not, or appear not to be, het-erosexual. Homophobia needs to be tackled just as much as do racism, sex-ism and other forms of discrimination.